All posts by jackebby

Mandatory Expatriates

My idea to change the world? Make it smaller (figuratively, of course)

My video backdrop is from the viral hit “Where the Hell is Matt?” in which now-internet celebrity Matt Harding filmed himself dancing in various locations throughout the world.

Here is the video I used- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlfKdbWwruY

But he has a bunch more that all have hundreds of millions of views.

 

Who’s Really Helping Out the Little Guy? Mackey vs Rozyne

For my conversation, I decided to imagine a conversation between Michael Rozyne and John Mackey discuss their respective company’s relationship with regional/local farmers with Farmer Zack Fisher, a small-scale local farmer looking to market his produce to supermarkets.

Continue reading Who’s Really Helping Out the Little Guy? Mackey vs Rozyne

Dinner with the King of Soul

If I could have dinner with one person living or dead, my answer for years has been the late, great Sam Cooke.  Nicknamed the King of Soul, Sam was an American singer-songwriter and recording artist who is generally considered to be one of the greatest of all time.  He is known for being a pioneer in the field of soul, credited with giving rise to musicians like James Brown, Aretha Franklin, and Marvin Gaye to name a few.  In addition to this, he is also my all-time favorite musician across all genres.  While I would love to talk to Sam about his music, there is another side of him which I would use this dinner to learn about.  Sam Cooke was one of the first musicians to take an active role in the Civil Rights movement. Continue reading Dinner with the King of Soul

So Why Did We Care?

In our third time around with the Mike Daisey and Apple story, I am left with three main thoughts, being both novel and recurring.

The first, and most prominent to me, was the question that I have not been fully able to answer across all three blogs: If this wasn’t all about Apple, would we really have cared? Did Mike Daisey’s story of Foxconn, beit true or false, only catch our attention because it was about a Man and a Company so revered by us that we couldn’t dare imagine Apple as being anything but the most ethical, the most innovative, and most popular company.  But what if Mike Daisey had chosen to highlight Foxconn’s conditions under the context of Samsung, or Nokia?  Would TAL have given it airtime?  Would he have been asked to come to speak at tech/no?  The answer I tend to believe is no, Continue reading So Why Did We Care?

“Because I think it made you care”

I empathize with Ira Glass’ in his anger toward Mike Daisey.  The Mike Daisey mishap is an embarrassment to This American Life.  Ira Glass and producer Brian Reed both vouched for the validity of a story that turned out to be false.  T.A.L. was arguably justified in retracting the radio show for its journalistic errors.  The issue, however, is that Mike Daisey is not necessarily a journalist.  Mike Daisey is an actor, or a type of activist.  He stated, “My mistake, the mistake that I truly regret is that I had it on your show as journalism and it’s not journalism. It’s theater. I use the tools of theater and memoir to achieve its dramatic arc and of that arc and of that work I am very proud because I think it made you care, Ira, and I think it made you want to delve.”  Though he does so retroactively, this quote has great importance.  It is less important to me as to whether Mike Daisey thinks his work is journalism or art.  What is important to me is the goal of the ‘act’ in Daiseys mind.  Daisey goes on to talk about how his fabrications were woven into his narrative of his trip to China because people had lost interest in the Foxconn scandal.  This is taking his apology to be truth, which I am hesitant to do.  “[…]And he says that made a strong impression on him, seeing the coverage vanish like that, seeing people suddenly not interested in the workers there anymore[…]And he wanted to make a monologue that would make people care. That was his goal.”

Continue reading “Because I think it made you care”

Do We Blame Apple, Or Ourselves?

My experience listening to this podcast was in a way, very similar to that of Mike Daisey as he explored the Foxconn factory: I was very much aware of Apple’s Foxconn scandal, yet Daisey’s journey to Foxconn opened my eyes to the harsh realities and atrocities behind the press coverage. Hearing statistics such as number of employees, alongside the average shift duration, (12-14+ hours), was appalling.  What was interesting for me was that as I listened to the podcast on my Macbook Pro, with my iPhone sitting beside; I started to mentally deconstruct each device and imagine them being made in the Foxconn plant.  Listening to Mike Daisey describe the labor-intense process that goes into each device made me think much deeper about the pieces of technology I posses:  Daisey describes how Foxconn not only has contracts with Apple, but also with major tech-giants like Microsoft, Sony, and Hewlett-Packard to name a few.  Taking a different approach to this podcast, I thought mostly about how we as consumers, and citizens of a global community fit into the Foxconn-Apple narrative.

Upon hearing the podcast, I researched the media coverage of the ‘Foxconn Scandal’, when the atrocities at the Foxconn factories were originally brought to light.  During the periods of high media coverage in 2010 and 2012, Apple’s stock price only grew.  Daisey alludes to the idea of Apple as a religion in the beginning of his excerpt, and it is a fact which I believe is key in the perpetuation of this narrative at Foxconn.  Arguably Daisey’s most powerful quote is when he states “Do you really think Apple doesn’t know?”  This speaks to the notion that Apple, a company that is resolute in its standards for quality and control over the design of their products, would not be fully aware of the production processes taking place.  While Dailey’s words are powerful, they are not necessarily surprising.  Apple, and the other tech-companies employing Foxconn, undoubtedly know the atrocities which occur in Foxconn factories.  What we as consumers have shown Apple in particular, is that so long as Apple turns a blind eye, we as consumers shall do the same.  

In talking about the Apple religion, Daisey states that one of the most dangerous things to any religion is ‘when people think’. Looking at your Macbook Pro, or iPhone and thinking deeply about how the product was made.   As consumers in this age of transparency, we are granted the ability to make decisions with access to information.  There is a disparity between the reactions to hearing stories at Foxconn, and our reactions to hearing the latest Apple product or ad.  Thus the obsession with Apple products is arguably unhealthy, as it contributes in part to a culture in which a company can make brutally unethical decisions, and receive positive feedback from consumers and retain stringent brand loyalty.

 

Trial Blog Post

I read mostly blogs under the business ethics tag, and found it very interesting to see the variation in depth and context across each analysis.  I liked that not every blog was about clean cut examples of ethical or unethical companies; there were some argumentative pieces that were in depth examinations of companies from a multi-faceted view.  I liked how blogs often dug deep into contextual analysis of companies from a historical standpoint, and commented on the many factors behind each decision, be it ethical or nonethical.  Stylistically, I liked how many of the blog posts read like a research paper but aesthetically looked less formal.  Blogs incorporated classic written analysis and also other forms of media like empirical charts and graphics, videos, and images which made the overall messages more clear.  One additional aspect I hope to see replicated in our class was the presence of engaging and meaningful discussion by other class participants that continued upon the main points of blog posts.  On the topic of business ethics, it was interesting to see students engaged in discussion on the validity of the argument in each post, and add in elements of their own.

Trial Blog Post

I read mostly blogs under the business ethics tag, and found it very interesting to see the variation in depth and context across each analysis.  I liked that not every blog was about clean cut examples of ethical or unethical companies; there were some argumentative pieces that were in depth examinations of companies from a multi-faceted view.  I liked how blogs often dug deep into contextual analysis of companies from a historical standpoint, and commented on the many factors behind each decision, be it ethical or nonethical.  Stylistically, I liked how many of the blog posts read like a research paper but aesthetically looked less formal.  Blogs incorporated classic written analysis and also other forms of media like empirical charts and graphics, videos, and images which made the overall messages more clear.  One additional aspect I hope to see replicated in our class was the presence of engaging and meaningful discussion by other class participants that continued upon the main points of blog posts.  On the topic of business ethics, it was interesting to see students engaged in discussion on the validity of the argument in each post, and add in elements of their own.