All posts by santi mansilla

Get Active

The percentage of children aged 6–11 years in the United States who were obese increased from 7% in 1980 to nearly 18% in 2012. Similarly, the percentage of adolescents aged 12–19 years who were obese increased from 5% to nearly 21% over the same period. Overweight and obesity are the result of “caloric imbalance” or too few calories expended for the amount of calories consumed, primarily because of lack of exercise.[1]

Continue reading Get Active

Tesla, the Battery Company. Not the Car Company.

Efficiency through effective, but most importantly, environmentally friendly manners is a relentless goal for all organizations within our society. One of the companies that has best been able to achieve this goal throughout recent years has without a doubt been Tesla Motors. The American company has gained significant public attention for their designs, manufacturing, and selling of electric cars that has not only made them one of the most recognizable automobile companies, but also one of the most environmentally friendly companies throughout the globe. This is primarily because of their capabilities to reduce car emissions. However, despite their efforts to reduce the negative effects on the environment, throughout this essay I will argue that what makes Tesla Motors most unique is not their cars, but rather, their batteries.

Continue reading Tesla, the Battery Company. Not the Car Company.

Millennial Man and Amish Fella

After reading the blog prompt for this week, I thought it would be interesting to create a dialogue between two individuals from completely different sides of a spectrum. My two individuals are a Millennial, aka me and a member of the Amish community. The purpose of this dialogue would be to compare the lives of someone who performs almost every daily action with technology and someone who performs almost every daily action without technology.

Continue reading Millennial Man and Amish Fella

Dinner with Michael Jordan

If I could have dinner with one person, it would without a doubt be with one of my favorite athletes of all time, Michael Jordan. I’m sure we all know who Michael Jordan is, but incase you don’t, let me give you a little background information. The G.O.A.T. (Greatest of all time) is a former NBA basketball player and also one of the most iconic professional athletes of all time. Throughout his 15 NBA seasons, Jordan was a 6x NBA Champion, 6x NBA Finals MVP, 5x regular season MVP, 1x Defensive Player of the Year, 14x NBA All-Star, 3x All-Star Game MVP, 10x NBA scoring champion, 2x NBA slam dunk champion and 3x AP Athlete of the Year. These are only some of Jordan’s most significant accolades, but Jordan not only made an impact on the court throughout his career, he also significantly impacted the corporate world during and after his illustrious career. Continue reading Dinner with Michael Jordan

School or Business?

I want to start off by saying, I expected Ed Freeman’s talk to be significantly educational, but wow….I didn’t know that he was going to have the most awesome beard. After reading many of the posts regarding Freeman’s speech, I wanted to take a bit of a different approach in regards to his theories of ethics for businesses. Continue reading School or Business?

The Googler

After reading the blog prompt, the first company I immediately thought of was Google. The reason why I chose Google is because after working in New York City this past summer I met numerous individuals working for a variety of companies such as Goldman Sachs, SumZero, Contrarian Capital and last but not least, Google. Of all these firms, everyone told me how they were working extremely long hours, how their bosses were jerks and how their offices were nothing special. All mentioned similar things about their working environments, except for my friend’s roommate, Adam, who had recently began working at Google. Let me start by saying that no one in our friend group called Adam, Adam. We called him The Googler. This is because when he initially joined Google, he not only joined the company of Google, but most importantly, he joined the culture of Google. On Adam’s first day he was welcomed by a colleague greeting him, “Hey!!! You’re a Googler now!” This was the beginning of his incredible job experience. Adam was the only one in our friend group who raved about his work and how amazing everything at Google was. He had constant energy, but most importantly, he did not consider work as work. He sincerely told us how it was his responsibility to provide the best he could for his clients. This is because of Google’s work culture, which all starts with one of their mottos: “It’s really the people that make Google the kind of company it is.” Google’s culture not only embodies everything of a utopian work environment, but most importantly, demonstrates that a good employer leads to good outcomes. Incase you have never seen any of Google’s complexes, next time you’re bored and on the Internet, go ahead and search Google offices. Or take a look at Some of Google’s office spaces here. These offices are insane! Some have bowling allies, nap-pods, rock climbing walls and even hair salons. Oh, and did I mention the free food that the employees also get? It is evident that Google believes in providing the best working environment for their employees in order to get the best quality of work out of their stakeholders in return. Due to theses incredible, facilities and benefits, Adam was truly producing his best quality of work in return and most likely so are other Googlers. Today, Adam, or the Googler continues to work at Google as an account manager for retail clients. He not only loves his job, but truly believes that Google extremely values their employees because it will lead to better outcomes. In addition to constant donations for renewable energy projects and creating their own energy-efficient projects, the efforts of Google exemplify their social responsibility as a major corporation. By providing their internal structure of the company with the best possible aid, Google stakeholders are propelled to externally provide the best for others.

Made in China

Ok, so I understand this is supposed to be a play for educational purposes, but it’s a play about a tech company. I mean, have consumers have become so obsessed with this company that individuals are even performing plays about its history and products? Continue reading Made in China

Where and Who Really Makes Apple Products

In the excerpt The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs, Mike Daisey provides a stimulating examination of the exploitation of Chinese employees of the FOXCONN manufacturing plant. The extensive and vivid podcast of Daisey not only demonstrates the harsh working conditions of the Chinese employees, but also provides a distinct perspective of Apple products. In America, each individual is a participant of our consumerist society. Due to this fact, I believe we fail to recognize certain negative aspects that tend to go unnoticed that are unveiled in this podcast such as: where our products are made and whom they are made by.

The first negative aspect of production that I will discuss is where our products are made. In the podcast, reporter Mike Daisey shares his experience of when he traveled to China to visit the massive manufacturing plant FOXCONN. This Chinese plant employs 430,000 employees varying in many ages. I have been in many football stadiums numerous times with massive capacities of 80,000-90,000 people, but just the thought of picturing 430,000 people working in one place is unimaginable. In addition to the large size of this plant, employees must also take breaks and eat lunch in cafeterias that are only fit to hold about 4,000 people at a time. This is simply unreasonable and not sanitary. Although these employees do voluntarily come to work here and make a living, they are asked to work illogical hours and in rigorous conditions, which we simply never think about because we are distracted by our precious iPhones.

The second issue is, whom our products are made by. I would want to elaborate on why I say our products. In the podcast, Daisey explains how many of the employees have never even see the finished product. Ironically, although hundreds of thousands of employees work on the products, they hardly ever get to hold one afterwards. Additionally, not only do employees work extensive hours on these products, but many of them are also are physically impaired and are young teenagers. Essentially, many of the employees who make our precious Apple products should not be working in this factory.

There are various aspects of the podcast that I liked, but most of all I enjoyed how the podcast made me think of things we Apple consumers do not usually think of. In our consumerist society we tend to ignore where and who makes our products, as long as we have our product. This normative thinking has resulted in unethical working conditions for such employees at FOXCONN, but mostly importantly, ignorance from us consumers to recognize what is actually going on before we receive our finished products.