Surfing Blogs (Trial Blog)

While surfing the blog website, I stumbled upon one called, “Fixing Our Loan Problem”, posted on December 8th by a student named Chris M. Find the original post here. Several things about this piece caught my eye. First and foremost, there was the title. This student had undertaken a task that was very applicable to his peers and Bucknell’s student body. He had commented on the nature of applying to and taking out loans from the federal government. The blogger believes that the mass of loan debt in our nation is too significant, and that restrictions for loans should be tightened. This is a strong statement to make considering the person next to him in class could be on financial aid. However, I respected that the blogger took on such a real topic. Moreover, my eye was also drawn to the fact that he used political cartoons as graphics. This seemed to get his message across in a way that was very understandable to readers. Moreover, both pictures indicated different parts of the loan debt story; one described the giant mass that most college kids are left over with, while the other pointed out the long repayment time.
Although I respected this student’s graphic features and austerity on addressing a very real topic, I did have some suggestions for content. For one, he solves the problem by saying the government should have greater restrictions when handing out money to students; they should consider things like high school grades, prestige of college, and a student’s intended major. These are all preliminary to the real world, and could restrict education to the underprivileged. Perhaps the blogger could have considered things after the fact, like subsidies for the already employed.

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Trial Post

One of the first posts I came across when viewing the past blog was a post titled “Cool Design for an iPhone”. I found this post when clicking on the “technology” tag. Although this was a relatively short post, I liked how the author of the post started off by asking a few questions. This got me thinking about what the cool design might be before even watching the video that was posted below. The language of the post illustrated to me that this topic is something the author is both passionate about, and interested in. The author not only posed a few questions to begin the post, but also stated his/her own opinion about the product as well. Additionally, the video posted was concise (2:47), well-made, and intriguing. I think occasionally posting short videos would add a nice touch to our class blog. While I am unaware of what the author was instructed to post in this instance, more detail regarding the pro’s and con’s of the product would add valuable information to the post. For anyone interested in watching the video describing a new, innovative type of phone called the “phoneblok,” you can find it here.

Trial Blog Post

I read mostly blogs under the business ethics tag, and found it very interesting to see the variation in depth and context across each analysis.  I liked that not every blog was about clean cut examples of ethical or unethical companies; there were some argumentative pieces that were in depth examinations of companies from a multi-faceted view.  I liked how blogs often dug deep into contextual analysis of companies from a historical standpoint, and commented on the many factors behind each decision, be it ethical or nonethical.  Stylistically, I liked how many of the blog posts read like a research paper but aesthetically looked less formal.  Blogs incorporated classic written analysis and also other forms of media like empirical charts and graphics, videos, and images which made the overall messages more clear.  One additional aspect I hope to see replicated in our class was the presence of engaging and meaningful discussion by other class participants that continued upon the main points of blog posts.  On the topic of business ethics, it was interesting to see students engaged in discussion on the validity of the argument in each post, and add in elements of their own.

Trial Blog Post

I read mostly blogs under the business ethics tag, and found it very interesting to see the variation in depth and context across each analysis.  I liked that not every blog was about clean cut examples of ethical or unethical companies; there were some argumentative pieces that were in depth examinations of companies from a multi-faceted view.  I liked how blogs often dug deep into contextual analysis of companies from a historical standpoint, and commented on the many factors behind each decision, be it ethical or nonethical.  Stylistically, I liked how many of the blog posts read like a research paper but aesthetically looked less formal.  Blogs incorporated classic written analysis and also other forms of media like empirical charts and graphics, videos, and images which made the overall messages more clear.  One additional aspect I hope to see replicated in our class was the presence of engaging and meaningful discussion by other class participants that continued upon the main points of blog posts.  On the topic of business ethics, it was interesting to see students engaged in discussion on the validity of the argument in each post, and add in elements of their own.

Trial Run Blog Post

Overall, I really enjoyed the time I spent going back through past class blogs. I read through a lot of past blogs, and searched different tags and categories. One think I found interesting was alumni category on the homepage. Using this, I discovered the Coffee Hour with Entrepreneur Cory Bishop ’12 that was hosted last fall . I learned that Cory is the founder and CEO of Zoot-it, which is an app designed to allow users to follow their favorite stories. Personally, I am really interesting in networking and alumni relations. I thought it was cool how there was an alumni category that had relevant information about Cory coming to Bucknell last fall. I was also impressed with how many blogs were on the Class Hub, and how simple it was to navigate. Below is the link to Cory’s visit. I’m embarrassed to say I still have not figured out how to embed a hyperlink. http://careerinsider.blogs.bucknell.edu/2013/08/29/alumni-coffee-hour-with-cory-bishop-12-entrepreneur/ 

Thoughts on “Read This and Hack!”

This week, I read some of the “Read This and Hack!” blog. In the blog I found many topics I enjoyed, ranging from green architecture to data mining to obesity. However, my favorite entries were the “60 second ideas” written by the students. But no matter the post I was reading, they all had one important thing in common; they were all casual, contained loads of information and good insights, and were short. The posts were able to grab my attention, keep it, and by the time I was ready to be done reading, they were over.

As a critique, I would say that the page layout of the blog was not my favorite. I found it very difficult to find what I was looking for. I also thought it was very confusing to have posts from professional authors mixed in with those of students. I could not tell if they were articles simply posted on the blog from somewhere else or if they were written specifically for the blog. All in all, however, I genuinely enjoyed “Read This and Hack.”

 

"we're gonna lie to a lot of people…"

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