Tag Archives: bucknell forum

Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

I actually got to meet Jason DeRulo after the concert last week– we talked ethics for a hot sec.

Do you think your goal as an artist is to be the most profitable tour or to express yourself and bring the most joy to your fans? Continue reading Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

John Mayer

Wow, a very open ended blog post! I love it. I like how this blog is evolving in terms of content and style.

I would have dinner with John Mayer. If you know me at all, this is extremely believable. Despite the flak I may receive from my peers, I stand by my statement. But why John Mayer? Continue reading John Mayer

A Question for Ed Freeman

A question I would ask Ed Freeman: Have your theories of stakeholderism changed over time because of events in the financial world/catastrophic global events? And a follow up question, do you think Stakeholder Theory will hold true in the next 50 years?

In terms of the way Freeman seemed to answer every question that was thrown at him– he seemed to say “my theory is perfect, but no company is perfect, so it is impossible to follow it”. Especially when Jordi himself questioned Walmart’s Stakeholder practices, Freeman answered in the aforementioned manner. 

Is Freeman’s theory about Stakeholderism now impotent because even he believes it is impossible for any company to stay true to the theory? Or is Stakeholder theory just a soft guideline?
Overall, I thought Freeman kept his talk very concise and used real world examples, which I am a huge fan of.

The Gap Between American Understanding and Chinese Reality

As much as I hate to admit it, I definitely have a tendency to initially overreact to a story or piece of journalism after encountering it for the first time. My experiences over the past several weeks regarding the Mike Daisey story are a prime example of that. When I first heard Mike Daisey’s original monologue on This American Life two weeks ago, I came away shocked, confused, and angry. I was ready to burn my MacBook and boycott Apple forever. Maybe it was Daisey’s tone, maybe it was because it was an assignment from a professor, but I definitely believed Daisey and reacted strongly against Apple. I did not stop to consider that parts of the story that did not seem to add up. Continue reading The Gap Between American Understanding and Chinese Reality

How we’re building the middle class in China

Image copyright: Ryan Pyle for The New York Times

Are we, the U.S. consumers, monsters for heartlessly exploiting workers in developing countries to feed our endless greed for electronics? Or are we recipients of the wonder of globalization, which is also slowly making China a better place? While I’ve touched on this issue on other blog posts, Professor Zhu’s contribution in “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs” made look deeper into this issue.

Continue reading How we’re building the middle class in China

Pushing Daiseys

mike-daisey-decoder-blog480Mike Daisey is an accomplished storyteller, there is no doubting that. So accomplished, in fact, that he was able to draw large quantities of empathy from his audiences through his captivating tale. Even more intriguing is that Daisey stays true to the mold of “storyteller” by fabricating parts of his story– in the same manner that an old bard in Ancient Greece might fabricate parts of the tales of great Odysseus to enthrall the audience. Continue reading Pushing Daiseys

Blog 2- Art, Truth, and Lies

 

What is truth?  Lies?  Who gets to decide?

Montage of Daisey and Jobs from New York Magazine

Now things get complicated.  You heard This American Life’s podcast focusing on Mike Daisey’s monologue-play and the issues it raises about Apple, China, worker rights, us as consumers, and globalization. Continue reading Blog 2- Art, Truth, and Lies