Tag Archives: Business Ethics

BLOG COUNCIL 8: DIALOGUES

Some posts still do not have the “read more” tab. Please be sure to add these to your posts so our news feeds are more condensed and show more previews of posts. Great job on the blog this week! We loved how many people gave a great background prior to writing their dialogue. We found that most individuals blog was based on a personal interest. We thought that was a nice touch!! We believe everyone in the class showed their creative side through their dialogue. We look forward to seeing this creativity in the upcoming blog.

Superlatives:

Great Three-Sided Conflict Continue reading BLOG COUNCIL 8: DIALOGUES

How Many Sides are Too Many Sides to a Story?

This is Terry Greenwood.  He is one of many in Pennsylvania affected by negligent fracking practices.  Terry makes a living by raising and selling cattle.  In recent years, his business has declined because his animals are getting sick.  The company working on Terry’s property did not regulate water management practices to help keep his animal’s drinking water safe.  Terry pays around $800 a year for water now.  He has lost acreage on his farm due to spillage, roads, and trash from the company.

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Continue reading How Many Sides are Too Many Sides to a Story?

Epic Showdown: Tim Cook vs Mike Daisey (with a guest star as well)

This post is inspired by a stint of research into what Apple executives’ reaction was to the “Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs”. Even though on a corporate communications level, Apple has responded to the conditions portrayed by Mike Daisey, Apple’s executives shied away from making public statements about Mike Daisey’s allegations…until today… Continue reading Epic Showdown: Tim Cook vs Mike Daisey (with a guest star as well)

Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

I actually got to meet Jason DeRulo after the concert last week– we talked ethics for a hot sec.

Do you think your goal as an artist is to be the most profitable tour or to express yourself and bring the most joy to your fans? Continue reading Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

Dinner with Michael Jordan

If I could have dinner with one person, it would without a doubt be with one of my favorite athletes of all time, Michael Jordan. I’m sure we all know who Michael Jordan is, but incase you don’t, let me give you a little background information. The G.O.A.T. (Greatest of all time) is a former NBA basketball player and also one of the most iconic professional athletes of all time. Throughout his 15 NBA seasons, Jordan was a 6x NBA Champion, 6x NBA Finals MVP, 5x regular season MVP, 1x Defensive Player of the Year, 14x NBA All-Star, 3x All-Star Game MVP, 10x NBA scoring champion, 2x NBA slam dunk champion and 3x AP Athlete of the Year. These are only some of Jordan’s most significant accolades, but Jordan not only made an impact on the court throughout his career, he also significantly impacted the corporate world during and after his illustrious career. Continue reading Dinner with Michael Jordan

John Mayer

Wow, a very open ended blog post! I love it. I like how this blog is evolving in terms of content and style.

I would have dinner with John Mayer. If you know me at all, this is extremely believable. Despite the flak I may receive from my peers, I stand by my statement. But why John Mayer? Continue reading John Mayer

Let’s Surf and Get Dinner

Presidents, activists, famous artists and religious figures dance through my head. Then, I reflect on the book I just finished: Let My People Go Surfing- The Education of a Reluctant Businessman by Yvon Chouinard, the founder and owner of Patagonia. The book reflects on Chouinard’s experiences in business and how he came to form Patagonia and its strategy. Continue reading Let’s Surf and Get Dinner

Say vs. Do

Let me start off by saying by acknowledging how much I enjoyed Ed Freeman’s lecture. After reading several of his works I was definitely intrigued to listen to what he had to say, but in no way thought it was going to be as interesting as it was. I felt that his lecture was very down to earth and relatable. I especially enjoyed his use of examples of companies that I was familiar with.

Although I did not get to ask my question someone in the crowd asked a very similar one. I wanted to ask Ed Freeman how one identifies a company that prioritizes ethics and takes their stakeholders interests into serious consideration when making decisions. I found the question that most closely related to this was the one about when interviewing with companies how do you identify the ones that are more stakeholder oriented than shareholder. I found Freeman’s response to be very clear and wise. He said “look at what they do rather than what they say”. He acknowledged how companies will show you pamphlets of their company mission and more information about them. He said that’s when you ask to see their budget. By doing this you can see where they are REALLY allocating their resources and whether or not they are all talk or actually follow through with what they say they do. Being a younger adult who will soon venture into the professional business world I found this to be great advice to have in my back pocket and keep in mind when interviewing with companies.

SAS’s Silver Lining

In this blog post I’m going to explore the very unusual working conditions at SAS Software (FYI-their cafeteria has octopus shaped hot dogs for kids-enough said)

Inside Fortune’s 100 Best Places to Work, on the second place lies SAS Software based in Cary, North Carolina. Odds are you haven’t heard about this company if statistics is not your hobby (I know I haven’t until my Organizational Theory class). This company however, provides high-grade statistical software to both government agencies and private enterprises. In fact, most of Fortune 500 companies use SAS software in one shape or form. By using SAS, companies optimize their retail prices, compile results from clinical trials, track usage patterns in casinos, get insight from social media and marketing , optimize communications, track fraud, model risk, do scenario analysis, make fine pancakes.

Continue reading SAS’s Silver Lining