Tag Archives: controversial

Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

I actually got to meet Jason DeRulo after the concert last week– we talked ethics for a hot sec.

Do you think your goal as an artist is to be the most profitable tour or to express yourself and bring the most joy to your fans? Continue reading Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

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So What do the Players Think?

Background: I remain very interested in the Nike case. It seems as though Nike has not fully resolved the conflict they face between cutting costs and treating workers fairly. Despite the many improvements the company has made after their fiscal struggles in 1998, I still am very skeptical that Nike is producing their apparel in the most morally correct fashion. The problem may not be nearly as bad as it was in the late 1990s, but I think a problem with worker exploitation still exists for the company. Nike sponsors many elite college athletic programs, including the Florida State football team, which won the National Championship last January. I wondered what would happen if I discussed the issue of Nike exploiting workers with a Florida State player. Continue reading So What do the Players Think?

John Mayer

Wow, a very open ended blog post! I love it. I like how this blog is evolving in terms of content and style.

I would have dinner with John Mayer. If you know me at all, this is extremely believable. Despite the flak I may receive from my peers, I stand by my statement. But why John Mayer? Continue reading John Mayer

Creative Reporting Tactics

“Mr. Daisey and Apple” was one of the most interesting podcasts I have ever listened to (aside from being the only podcast I’ve ever listened to…). Continue reading Creative Reporting Tactics

Defining Words: A 1st Grade Skill is Still Applicable to Adulthood

When reading a news article or listening to a news podcast, how do you decide what to believe? Do you take everything at face value? Do you fact-check? The answer differs for each individual. It also differs based on who is reporting the news. But what happens when something written for artistic purposes is reported as news? The answer: the “Retraction” on This American Life of Mike Daisey’s story on Foxconn.

Continue reading Defining Words: A 1st Grade Skill is Still Applicable to Adulthood

Know Your Company Before You Consume

Apple is a company that uses any edge it can to outsell their competitors. Apple’s products are serene and full of life. They contain elements that may not seem logical from a simple marketing standpoint, but make all the difference in the mind of a consumer. For instance, the Siri App answers questions and tasks in a coy manner– the user asks where Siri was made, and Siri responds “I am not allowed to say”, almost with attitude. These little things separate an iPhone from a Samsung Galaxy, which may superficially function in the same manner, but users may prefer an iPhone even when they can’t exactly say why.

The technology market is extremely competitve, to say the least. It seems that as soon as you purchase your technology (such as an iPhone), there is a newer iPhone released in the next month. The aspects and working parts of technology are so critical because technology is so rapidly growing. Technology companies have the critical role of convincing consumers that every little bit of technology makes their product better than the next. Apple uses this philosophy as the cornerstone of their operations, with advertising all the way through the packaging on their products. Apple is the product king– they are the best in their field in a field which has the highest demand for the marketing of products.

However, with Mike Daisey’s compelling tale of Shenzhen, we must always be aware of the other side– Apple may seem like a perfect company with innovative products, but they are also exploiting workers in sweatshops in China. Apple’s secrecy helps them to retain brand equity and this aura of perfection among their products. By doing so, consumers are more likely to turn a blind eye to the mistreatment of workers. The author’s prose-like comical style is intriguing to say the least, but nonetheless is very informative about China’s role in the technology sphere. He gives life and tells personable, relatable stories about the factories and the people there. This is an enlightening story because these stories and situations are often hidden among the operations of the companies we buy products from. Our biggest flaw as humans is that we don’t know what we don’t know, and Mike Daisey creates empathy with the audience to learn about something very important when discussing technology and consuming electronics.