Tag Archives: Deceiving

Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

I actually got to meet Jason DeRulo after the concert last week– we talked ethics for a hot sec.

Do you think your goal as an artist is to be the most profitable tour or to express yourself and bring the most joy to your fans? Continue reading Jason DeRulo Talks Dirty to Me

John Mayer

Wow, a very open ended blog post! I love it. I like how this blog is evolving in terms of content and style.

I would have dinner with John Mayer. If you know me at all, this is extremely believable. Despite the flak I may receive from my peers, I stand by my statement. But why John Mayer? Continue reading John Mayer

Behind the Face of Facebook

The approach I took when considering what company I wanted to discuss throughout this blog post was to research companies with the best working conditions and then examine how this may, or may not correlate with ethical business practices. I ultimately came across Business Insider’s article, The 50 Best Companies to Work for in 2013, and was captivated by Facebook’s presence atop the list. Continue reading Behind the Face of Facebook

“So. That Happened”

“So. That happened.”

This quote, from the film State and Main, is one that Mike Daisey thinks about a lot. In the film, Alec Baldwin’s character crashes his car, flipping it upside down, and emerges with only a few bumps and scratches. He gets up, smiles, and states, “So. That Happened.” Mike Daisey found this quote to be especially relevant  in the days following TAL’s Retraction episode in which the lies and deceptions throughout his monologue, The Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs, were exposed to the world. Continue reading “So. That Happened”

Slaves to our Technological World

I found this podcast to be eye opening and powerful in regards to the manufacturing of our electronic devices that are attached to our hips 24/7. Building and assembling these devices that we have on us at all times is not just the job to many people, but also a physical and mental burden to the employees of Foxconn Factory. Many people do not even know where these devices are manufactured. I learned that the name of this town is Shenzhen. Daisey does an excellent job of setting the scene and explaining his first impressions when entering the town. He says that Shenzhen looked as if Blade Runner had thrown up on itself and with LED lights, neon colors and “ugly Chinese advertising”. I found this description to have an interesting connection to his reaction to being in the factory because he speaks about how he expected to hear the sounds of machinery, but instead he only heard the sounds of bodies in constant motion. The description of the town contrasts from the one of the factory because in a developed town you would think that there would be high tech machinery, but instead there is an abundant amount of overworked employees.

            It was evident that this investigation had a strong emotional impact on Daisey and he even says that he felt himself being “rewritten”. He asks the question of “how often do we wish things were hand made” embodying that human touch. The same “human touch” that these handmade products have are the hands of many employees that have permanent joint damage or even crippled hands from mishaps in the factory. The same hands of the people that slide into their coffin like beds with the lack of hope that tomorrow will be better and they soon will escape these awful conditions at Foxconn. The description of the living conditions of the employees had a strong affect on me because it was further proving how this is how these people live day to day-slaves to our technological world.

            Not only do the employees of Foxconn work in the over packed factories with no sound other than the motion of bodies, but also go to work everyday to see nets at the bottom of high buildings where many employees have committed suicide. In 2010 there were twelve suicides at the factory- twelve innocent lives that were lost due to the unethical and horrible working conditions. Every time I use my phone I will be more conscious of the amount of work that it took for people to assemble it. I will also be more aware of Apple’s lack of acknowledgement of the issues at Foxconn and how their obsession with details does not translate to their knowledge of these conditions when asked about them.