Tag Archives: social responsibility

Fat America: The Obesity Epidemic

The obesity epidemic in the United States has grown out of control. Over the past 35 years, obesity rates have more than doubled. The average American is more than 24 pounds heavier today than in 1960. Continue reading Fat America: The Obesity Epidemic

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RP – Social: Clean your plates!

“A 2004 study showed that forty to fifty per cent of all food ready for harvest in the United States never gets eaten” (Jones, 2014). The amount of food that’s thrown away across the world each day is absolutely despicable. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization released an estimate between 2010 and 2012 that estimated nearly 1 in 8 people in our world are “suffering from chronic undernourishment.” Continue reading RP – Social: Clean your plates!

The Googler

After reading the blog prompt, the first company I immediately thought of was Google. The reason why I chose Google is because after working in New York City this past summer I met numerous individuals working for a variety of companies such as Goldman Sachs, SumZero, Contrarian Capital and last but not least, Google. Of all these firms, everyone told me how they were working extremely long hours, how their bosses were jerks and how their offices were nothing special. All mentioned similar things about their working environments, except for my friend’s roommate, Adam, who had recently began working at Google. Let me start by saying that no one in our friend group called Adam, Adam. We called him The Googler. This is because when he initially joined Google, he not only joined the company of Google, but most importantly, he joined the culture of Google. On Adam’s first day he was welcomed by a colleague greeting him, “Hey!!! You’re a Googler now!” This was the beginning of his incredible job experience. Adam was the only one in our friend group who raved about his work and how amazing everything at Google was. He had constant energy, but most importantly, he did not consider work as work. He sincerely told us how it was his responsibility to provide the best he could for his clients. This is because of Google’s work culture, which all starts with one of their mottos: “It’s really the people that make Google the kind of company it is.” Google’s culture not only embodies everything of a utopian work environment, but most importantly, demonstrates that a good employer leads to good outcomes. Incase you have never seen any of Google’s complexes, next time you’re bored and on the Internet, go ahead and search Google offices. Or take a look at Some of Google’s office spaces here. These offices are insane! Some have bowling allies, nap-pods, rock climbing walls and even hair salons. Oh, and did I mention the free food that the employees also get? It is evident that Google believes in providing the best working environment for their employees in order to get the best quality of work out of their stakeholders in return. Due to theses incredible, facilities and benefits, Adam was truly producing his best quality of work in return and most likely so are other Googlers. Today, Adam, or the Googler continues to work at Google as an account manager for retail clients. He not only loves his job, but truly believes that Google extremely values their employees because it will lead to better outcomes. In addition to constant donations for renewable energy projects and creating their own energy-efficient projects, the efforts of Google exemplify their social responsibility as a major corporation. By providing their internal structure of the company with the best possible aid, Google stakeholders are propelled to externally provide the best for others.

What’s all the Hype, Mike?

I believe Mike Daisey was unethical in his description of what transpired with the Apple factories in China but I don’t consider him a liar but a great raconteur. I believe he stretched the truth to make it sound more compelling to the audience. As  journalist, one should be desire to report the facts at all times; however, as an artist you are able to unfold the “story” as you see fit.

On another note, American companies are outsourcing its labor and products to China to cut cost and have a larger profit margin. If individuals believe Apple should provide their customers with “guilt free” products, we probably should begin to reevaluate other manufacturers that we currently patronized. What does ” guilt free” really mean?

This dialogue is not the first one to surface about how bad factory employees in China are being treated and frankly I don’t think it will be the last. These thinks have occurred and we can honestly say that because it is not happening here (as far as we know) then it is their problem for as long as we can make a profit.

Can we consider this a social responsibility for us as consumers to not tolerate this type of conduct?